DANIEL ROTH SKELETON MASTER CHRONOGRAPH 'KHANJAR'

Regular price £29,995
Sale price £29,995 Regular price
Shipping calculated at checkout.
Book an appointment

Pickup available at London Showroom

Usually ready in 2-4 days

DANIEL ROTH SKELETON MASTER CHRONOGRAPH 'KHANJAR'

  • London Showroom

    Pickup available, usually ready in 2-4 days

    35/37 Ludgate Hill
    London EC4M 7JN
    United Kingdom

    +442072481321

FULLY AUTHENTICATED
PART EXCHANGE AVAILABLE
12 MONTH WARRANTY
FREE WORLD WIDE SHIPPING

THE ESSENTIALS

MAKE: DANIEL ROTH
MODEL: 447.X.60
YEAR: 2003
BOX/PAPERS: NO/NO
CASE DIAMETER: 38.5mm
CASE MATERIAL: 18K WHITE GOLD
BRACELET MATERIAL: LEATHER
MOVEMENT: AUTIOMATIC

Daniel Roth has a firm but unusual hold over the hearts of horologists, his eponymous outfit may not be the oldest but has solidified its name among its Swiss-Powerhouse counterparts with its graphic ‘Ellipsocurvex’ case designs and technical innovation. The path Roth took to his sharply executed vision of contemporary watchmaking is not an unfamiliar one; after completing an apprenticeship in Nice and later moving to Vallée de Joux, he joined Audemars Piguet. After almost a decade working for the Le Brassus based brand, and brief stint at Jaeger-LeCoultre, he left to join the Chaumet brothers who during the Quartz Crisis found themselves at the helm of a struggling Breguet. His contribution over this fifteen years cannot be overstated, and he is perhaps the only reason Breguet has such a concrete foothold in the watch world today.

Following that success, and a rather dramatic exit at Breguet, in 1989 Daniel Roth is established and represents one of the very first true independent watchmakers - with a design language that felt familiar to Breguet enthusiasts of the time, but with an exciting new direction, and for a time was rumoured to produce a mere 400 watches per-year in the town of Le Sentier. Working entirely alone at first, Roth built a small yet loyal customer base predominantly in Italy and Asia, then within four years growing to twelve watchmakers which still operated to incredibly limited production runs thanks to the employ of painstaking hand-finishing techniques on their decorated movements.

In 1994 after seeking additional investment, Daniel sold his managing stake and ultimately in 2000 was sold in its entirety to Bulgari, with Roth leaving a year later.  Though Roth himself didn’t remain, his core design principles did - and with models of the ‘Roth Era’ fetching increasingly eye-watering prices, many enthusiasts look to this post-Roth Era for an attainable alternative - and with this only sitting a few years into the Bulgari era it was likely worked on by the very team Daniel himself assembled ahead of the acquisition. Had this watch been produced by the very same people just a few years earlier, the price would likely be increased ten-times.

This example also happens to feature that ever-mysterious Khanjar insignia on its caseback - which depicts a traditional dagger on a belt atop two crossed swords. Its arguably as iconic as some of the watches it adorns and with its link to Middle Eastern Royalty (originating from the Sultanate of Oman) it is perhaps one of the very best hallmarks of provenance and sparks both imagination and significant value increases for collectors and enthusiasts. Traced back to the earliest days of Oman as a modern nation, it inextricably links this example to the Royal Family, and most likely the late Sultan of Oman himself; Qaboos bin Said al Said - the longest-serving monarch in the Middle East.

The story goes that following his attendance at a private school in Bury St Edmunds, England he moved to the Royal Military Academy at Sandhurst - befriending and later living with Tim Landon, AKA Brigadier Sir James Timothy Whittington Landon, KCVO, who went on to become not only one of the richest men in England, but also a key player in Qaboos’ introduction to John Asprey - who would later serve as an intermediary to some of the most prolific watch brands in the world and Qaboos - and thus facilitated the beginning of the ‘Khanjar Double Signed Dials.’

That brings us squarely to this example, which aside from Daniel Roth’s interesting history and its ties to Middle Eastern Royalty represents an exceptional horological exercise in-and-of-itself. The reference 447.X.60 features a white gold ‘Ellipsocurvex’ double-step case design and its skeletonised construction with floating salmon sub-dials and interior bezel allow the self-winding movement to take an unobstructed centre stage.  At six o'clock, a small date window is easy to miss. Blued hands allow the busy dial to remain supremely legible, and the addition of classic Roman Numerals around the exterior bezel add a touch of classical watchmaking whimsy. Running at an exceptional 3-seconds per-day with a strong amplitude and minimal beat-error, this watch presents a unique opportunity to own both a piece of horological excellence, but also a piece that is inextricably linked with Royalty.

Get in touch to discover more

If you have any questions about vintage watches, or about a particular watch in our collection, we're happy to answer them.